#53

The first principle is that you must not fool yourself – and you are the easiest person to fool.
— Richard Feynman, American physicist

The Speed Dial - An abbreviated set of articles for the reader who has limited time.

How to lead with clarity of purpose, plan, and responsibility
[wavelength.asana]

In an effort to cut through the chaos and confusion, teams resort to endless emails, chat threads, and status meetings. But these are symptoms of a larger issue: the lack of systematic clarity that would enable people to focus on their actual work instead of getting bogged down in the work about work of continually re-assessing what needs to get done every day.

 

The Uncounted
[nytimes]

U.S. military officials say the air war against ISIS is the most precise in history. But in Iraq, an on-the-ground investigation suggests that coalition airstrikes have killed many more civilians than previously reported.

 

Technical Decision Making
[medium]

There’s absolutely no dearth of technical advice to be found these days, be it on social media or on blog posts or at technical conferences or in publications. With the abundance of tooling of both the SaaS and open source persuasions, most vendors and open source communities are incentivized more than ever to influence developers and drum up support for their products. A challenge I’m generally seeing people on the other side of the equation — people who are consumers of the latest and greatest technologies — face is maneuvering their way through the cacophony of hype, thought leadership and equivocation and pick the right tool to solve the problems they actually have at hand.

 

Management/Culture

Your Strategy Has to Be Flexible — But So Does Your Execution
[hbr]

Peter Drucker said: “Plans are only good intentions unless they immediately degenerate into hard work.”  This and a slew of similar maxims reflect a common view of strategy execution: that it’s distinct from strategy, harder to pull off than defining a strategy, and therefore more critical to success — underpinned by seemingly indisputable virtues such as diligence, discipline, consistency, alignment, and focus. But such a simplistic view of execution can be misleading and can reduce actual impact.

 

How to Concentrate in a Collaborative Workplace
[open.nytimes]

How do you work effectively in a collaborative workplace? I’ve found a way to balance concentration and conversation, and would like to share techniques and habits for being productive.

 

Development/Releases

Agile Died While You Were Doing Your Standup
[mindtheproduct]

Despite the successes Agile has brought us, it’s time to take the things we have learned from Agile and move on. Like the technology we use to build the products we love ages and gets left behind, Agile has died while we were perfecting our standup.

 

A Tale of Two Approaches to Innovation – IxD vs. Proto/Test
[spin.atomicobject]

I’ll be making some gross generalizations about these two approaches. My goal is to highlight differences, not necessarily to give the precise, accurate description of each approach.

 

You are your tools
[lemire.me]

I believe that there are no miracle people. When others get the same work done as you do, only much faster, they are almost surely using better tools.

 

Technical

The Cost Of JavaScript
[medium]

As we build sites more heavily reliant on JavaScript, we sometimes pay for what we send down in ways that we can’t always easily see. In this post, I’ll cover why a little discipline can help if you’d like your site to load & be interactive quickly on mobile devices.

 

News/Other

Israel and Saudi Arabia: What's shaping the covert 'alliance'
[bbc]

To all intents and purposes, Saudi Arabia and Israel are de facto allies in the struggle against Iran's rising influence in the region. It's a developing but highly sensitive relationship, but every so often there is a hint of what may be going on beneath the surface.

We Interviewed 57 Female CEOs to Find Out How More Women Can Get to the Top
[hbr]

We secured the participation of 57 female CEOs — 41 from Fortune 1000 companies and 16 from large privately held companies. We then conducted a series of in-depth individual interviews, delving into pivotal experiences in their personal history and career progression, and using Korn Ferry’s executive online assessment to measure key personality traits and drivers that had an impact. Our goal: to crack the code of these women’s success, in order to help organizations better identify and leverage their highest-potential female leaders and to ensure more women succeed in the future.

 

Napping on the job may turn out to be a very good idea for a sleep-deprived nation
[washingtonpost]

Yet history is replete with powerful leaders and warriors such as Napoleon, Winston Churchill and John F. Kennedy who routinely napped in the afternoon, regardless of the crises swirling around them. “Nature has not intended mankind to work from eight in the morning until midnight without the refreshment of blessed oblivion, which even if it only lasts twenty minutes, is sufficient to renew all the vital forces,” Churchill once wrote.

Amazon’s Seattle campus is using a data center next door as a furnace. It’s pretty neat.
[vox]

Using “waste heat” from digital infrastructure to stay warm downtown.

 

Stop Using Excel, Finance Chiefs Tell Staffs
[wsj]

“I don’t want financial planning people spending their time importing and exporting and manipulating data, I want them to focus on what is the data telling us,” Mr. Garrett said. He is working on cutting Excel out of this process, he said

 

Ancient Data, Modern Math And The Hunt For 11 Lost Cities Of The Bronze Age
[washingtonpost]

Using numbers scrawled by Bronze Age merchants on 4,000-year-old clay tablets, a historian and three economists have developed a novel way to pinpoint the locations of lost cities of the ancient world.

 

Pentagon Contractor Leaves Social Media Spy Archive Wide Open On Amazon
[arstechnica]

A Pentagon contractor left a vast archive of social-media posts on a publicly accessible Amazon account in what appears to be a military-sponsored intelligence-gathering operation that targeted people in the US and other parts of the world.

 

Google Collects Android Users’ Locations Even When Location Services Are Disabled
[qz]

Even if you take all of those precautions, phones running Android software gather data about your location and send it back to Google when they’re connected to the internet, a Quartz investigation has revealed.

 

Uber Paid Hackers to Delete Stolen Data on 57 Million People
[bloomberg]

Hackers stole the personal data of 57 million customers and drivers from Uber Technologies Inc., a massive breach that the company concealed for more than a year. This week, the ride-hailing firm ousted its chief security officer and one of his deputies for their roles in keeping the hack under wraps, which included a $100,000 payment to the attackers.

 

How One Las Vegas Ed Saved Hundreds Of Lives After The Worst Mass Shooting In U.S. History[epmonthly]

The night that Stephen Paddock opened fire on thousands of people at a Las Vegas country music concert, nearby Sunrise Hospital received more than 200 penetrating gunshot wound victims. Dr. Kevin Menes was the attending in charge of the ED that night, and thanks to his experience supporting a local SWAT team, he’d thought ahead about how he might mobilize his department in the event of a mass casualty incident.

 

Could ghost imaging spy satellite be a game changer for Chinese military?
[scmp]

China is developing a new type of spy satellite using ghost imaging technology that could change the game of military cat and mouse within a decade, according to scientists involved in the project.

 

Just A Pair Of These $11 Radio Gadgets Can Steal A Car
[wired]

For years, automakers and hackers have known about a clever attack that spoofs the signal from a wireless car key fob to open a vehicle's doors, and even drive it away. But even after repeated demonstrations—and real thefts—the technique still works on a number of models. Now a team of Chinese researchers has not only demonstrated the attack again but also made it cheaper and easier than ever.